LESSON: JUMPING THROUGH HOOPS (B2-C1)

Vocabulary for describing changes to the rules. Speaking about travel restrictions using pronouns whichever, whatever, whoever, wherever and whoever.

1. In the past month, have you:

  • travelled more than 30 kilometres from your home?
  • travelled more than 3 kilometres from your home?
  • been to a shop to buy groceries?
  • been to a shop to buy clothes or household items?
  • been to a restaurant, cafe or pub?
  • travelled to another country, or know anyone who has?

2. What are the Covid restrictions like in your country? Talk about:

  • restrictions on residents of your country
  • controls on people entering your country

3. If you like, check the IATA map: if you click on a country you can find out what the rules are for international travellers.

4. How easy did you find it to answer question 2?

5. Here is some vocabulary relating to rules and restrictions. Can you match up the phrases on the left with the meanings on the right?

PhrasesMeanings
a. to keep track of changes in the rules1. to complete many bureaucratic stages
b. to jump through a lot of hoops2. to obey the law in all its detail
c. to make a U-turn3. to be aware of changing regulations
d. to follow the letter of the law4. to enforce the rules more firmly
e. to clamp down5. to reverse a decision
Answers are here.

6. Looking again at the phrases in part 5:

  • Which of these are things that governments do, and which are things that the public might do?
  • Can you relate these to your own life in your country or region? For example, has your government made any U-turns recently about what you can or can’t do?

7. Outside Covid, which processes involve jumping through the most hoops in your country?

For example: getting a passport, becoming self-employed, moving house, buying a car?

8. Here are two new sets of new Covid rules for parts of the United Kingdom (copied from the government website). Which set of rules is clearer – England or Wales? Which is stricter?

New Covid Rules for England

  • you can meet outdoors either in a group of 6 (from any number of households), or in a group of any size from up to 2 households (a household can include an existing support bubble, if eligible)
  • you can take part in formally organised outdoor sports with any number of people (outdoor sports venues and facilities will be able to reopen)
  • childcare and supervised activities are allowed outdoors for all children
  • formally organised parent and child groups can take place outdoors for up to 15 attendees. Children under 5 will not be counted in this number.

New Covid Rules for Wales

  • “Stay local” restrictions will be lifted
  • Self-contained accommodation can re-open
  • Outdoor children’s activities can take place
  • Libraries and archive services can re-open
  • 6 people from 2 households can meet outdoors, socially distanced.

(Taken from the government pages of England and Wales, accessed 1st April 2021)

9. Based on the information in part 8, are these statements true or false?

  1. In England, you can meet whoever you like, as long as it’s not more than 6 people and you meet outdoors.
  2. In England, you can meet however many people you like, from 2 other households.
  3. In England, you can play whatever sports you like.
  4. If you live in Wales, you can take a trip wherever you want within Wales and even stay overnight, provided that you follow all the other rules.
  5. In Wales, you can meet whoever you like, so long as it’s not more than 6 people and you meet outdoors.
  6. Children in England and Wales are allowed to take part in whichever outdoor activities are organised for them.

The solutions are here.

10. Try to describe the rules in your country or region, using the words whoever, whatever, whichever, wherever and however.

  • How do you anticipate the rules will change over April, May and June 2021?

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The cover photo is by Erik Mclean from Pexels.

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